Oh The Places We Go

This gallery contains 6 photos.

Today’s run coincided with St Piran’s Day, the national day of Cornwall, named after one of the patron saints of Cornwall. It was a stunning morning, the plan was to take to the coast path around Hartland with much excitement … Continue reading

Nature Nurtures.

This morning’s run was spent being nurtured by nature.

The view from my kitchen overlooks the countryside that I run in and is always goading me in with its green pastures and muddy trails. I can see my route out over the common that leads into the woods and this morning I was itching to get out there. Pancakes were made and the boys were off to school…this was my chance.

It was T-shirt weather out there today, which always makes me a happier runner. It certainly feels more like spring now. The still air, the muddy but not sodden ground, the protective ewes with their lambs, the pheasants that I startled and of course the spring flowers in the hedgerows & churchyard.

I have survived a winter of run training with all of it being completed in the great outdoors, the promise of spring has been long awaited and I’m one happy trail runner.

Towards the ocean

Moss covered wall image Tree lined route

Crew running

After reading an article on Twitter entitled The Urban Running Crew movement, I decided that I most certainly can class myself as part of a crew. Quite possibly a Rural Running Crew but a crew nonetheless. Charlie Dark from Run Dem Crew summed it up for me when he was quoted as saying “crew is about supporting and elevating everyone in it, particularly newcomers, beginners, and making everyone the best that they can be.”

That is it. That is why I run with this lovely lot. That’s why I feel included, a part of something, a sense of pride as well as feeling closer to a group of people who were strangers just a few months back.

Caked In Mud crew

Check out that cloud formation! The Iron Lady was watching over us!

Squelch Mud running

We embraced new Caked In Mud crew this morning. Runners who were already doing great things on pavements & roads, who fancied a change. The cake at the end was mentioned a couple of times, it has to be said, but let’s face it, you wouldn’t run 9 miles in the mud just for cake…would you?!

Running with the group enables me to push myself harder – there was certainly one hill I would have given up on if Jess had not cajoled me up there with her encouraging words. We were climbing for what seemed like forever to enjoy views like this

Views

More of the same next week? Oh, go on then. Oh, by the way, it was Carrot & Ginger Cake today with Chocolate & Pecan Brownies. Now, ask me again why I run!!

Team Honk Relay – the Cornish way.

That was the day that was…..

….the first day of Team Honk’s Blogger baton relay from Lands End to John O’Groats

….the first day I had run a section of the south west coast path in the dark

….the first day I had met Fiona from Coombe Mill after a few years of following her on Twitter

What a day!

The morning was spent checking twitter to see how Pippa @storyofmum was getting on as well as getting my boys to swimming and rugby. Pippa’s leg of the relay started at Lands End at 9am, putting their best foot forward for a wonky walk arriving in Penzance.

After travelling through the county to Jackie Murray in Truro it swiftly made its way to Fraddon escorted by the Coombe Mill crew whose fancy dress & quad bike antics made for a great time. Fiona & team then hot footed it over to Camelford, tweeting all the way, to arrive in time for the next portion of the journey.

The clouds were looming heavily over us as we sat waiting for news of the baton’s arrival, indeed we even had spots of rain starting. Ok then, the man suits went on and we were prepared to get a little damp.

My husband, James from Trewin Design Architects and his cycling buddy Stu Mitchell from Bond Oxborough Phillips took the baton from the effervescent Fiona to start their 27 mile cycle from Camelford to Morwenstow, where they would meet myself & some Caked In Mud crew to take on the last leg of that days journey. It was wonderful to meet Fiona after months of chatting online.

Camelford meet

Luckily for James & Stu, they had a tail wind all the way, ensuring they arrived dead on time to meet the lycra clad, waterproofed up runners. After saying a cheery farewell and passing the sign and the baton over, we set out on our journey, 9 miles of coast path running from Morwenstow to Hartland Quay.

Morwenstow handover Ready to run

A journey which as regular runners of this section of the coast path we knew would be a tough first half. With 2172 ft of ascents to take on in just the first 4 miles, it was a hard yet stunning first section. At this point the rain had not reached us, yet the winds were ensuring that we needed to hold on tight to the baton & the sign in case it decided to make its own way to John O’Groats via wind power alone! At times it very nearly did.

Air GuitarIt's a sign

The run itself was made all the more enjoyable by having a team of wonderfully supportive, fun loving runners alongside me. I would never have completed this one on my own. The weather started to take a turn for the worse at the half way mark & we really had to start putting some power into our running to give ourselves as many miles as possible in the daylight that was slowly fading.

We stopped off at Ronald Duncan’s hut to sit at his desk, take some much needed shelter and to mark our journey in the visitor’s book. It was tough to break away from the hut but we still had a journey to complete. We kept on running as the light would soon be fading.

The hut

The darkness hits you like nowhere else when you are out on the coast path. My ears became acutely switched on once darkness fell, the sound of the sea was incredible. We switched on our head torches and took it at a steady pace. One false turn and we would have been in trouble. Luckily Bridget and Roger, our navigators throughout, were past masters at coast path running, both in daylight & in the dark. I can’t explain how happy I was to see the lights of Hartland Quay.

We were soaked to the skin, cold, yet in such high spirits. We had been a part of something that started as a group of bloggers getting together to do something amazing for charity. The only part left to do was transport the baton to Jenny Paulin of Mummy Mishaps from the quay to Bideford. The story continues now with other areas of the country taking the baton, roller skating, swimming, walking and dancing their way through to the finale at John O’Groats.

The start (2) The middle (2) The End

What makes it worth it? Well, knowing that we are raising money for Sport Relief tends to spur you on, so please donate a fiver here as well as eating cake (the recipe for Divine Lemon Squares can be found on my EATS page) and finally sitting in a warm bath at the end of a busy, logistically challenging day tends to put everything into perspective. It had been a great day, now it’s over to the rest of the UK…..

Meeting Jenny at the very end of a busy day :)

Meeting Jenny at the very end of a busy day 🙂

Team Honk 2014 Relay – the Cornish bit!

teamhonkbadgeThis Sunday, I will be part of the Team Honk 2014 Blogger Relay, ensuring the baton makes the journey through Cornwall alongside fellow bloggers, friends and family for Sport Relief. Pippa Best from Story of Mum will be starting the relay off in style in Lands End at around 9am. The morning will involve a wonky walk with mums, dads & kids all donning mismatched shoes along the coast from Newlyn Green to Penzance. They then jump on a train to get the baton over to Fiona Cambouropoulos of Coombe Mill who will meet them in Truro. From there Fiona will be transporting the baton to Camelford with the help of a cycling Ted, after which I step in.

If all goes according to plan, the baton will take to two wheels from Camelford to Bude via a group of cyclists who will pass the baton over to the Caked in Mud runners. Putting our trail shoes on and our muddy feet forward, we will be running over the SW coast path to Hartland Quay, a journey of approx 15 miles with some lung busting elevations to take on! Head torches will be worn as the light will be going towards the end of the run. Once at Hartland, I may take a breather for a slice of cake and a cup of tea, well it wouldn’t be a Caked in Mud run if I didn’t! After refreshing the parts other hot beverages can’t reach, I will take to four wheels in order to meet up with our final Honker in Bideford who will then take the baton through border crossings to Somerset for the start of Day 2. A journey of approx. 41 miles will be achieved by cycling, running and motoring through the northern section of the county.

If you happen to see us on our travels through Cornwall this Sunday, do Honk!

To see how the relay will continue throughout the UK, please follow this link Honkers are still needed for various sections around the country so please check out how you can take part.

 

 

What makes a run a good run?

In my case, it certainly does not depend on the weather. In the last 18 months, I have shed my fair-weather runner skin and morphed into a bring it on kind of runner.

Today’s run was evidence of this change. Storm clouds were brewing as I layered up this morning, getting ready to hit the coast paths and trails around Millook, North Cornwall. It looked like we were in for more storms towards the latter part of the day, so getting out in the morning was sensible.

Starting point

View at the start – Millook

An hour into the run, the group were under no illusions that the wind was picking up, the proximity of us to the coast path made us first hand witnesses to the changing size of the waves breaking onto Chipman Strand. At this point we diverted and made our way inland – a sensible option it was duly noted! I think the wind had whipped us all into a crazy frenzy as we had a giggle for the duration of our 8.5 mile run. The wind at times made moving forwards a sport within itself. We really did have added resistance today. We slipped & slid down many a muddy track, screamed like girls (me) and landed on our posteriors (Sarah), climbed every stile, choreographed the Morecambe & Wise Bring Me Sunshine dance through a field and stopped for some amazing views & photo opportunites.

Sunday Run

The Crew

 

I always look forward to running with a group, not always the same people but always good to chat with, who encourage you up the hills, pass you a fruit pastille or three or arrange to take on certain events with.

What makes a run a good one for you?

A good run for me incorporates being out with people, chatting, laughing, enjoying the space I am in, feeling strong, getting fitter, eating cake with the crew and of course, coming home with a little mud between my toes.

Winter training = beauty treatments for FREE.

Winter running brings about its own challenges. There is an element of, do I really want to get out in this? as you leave your warm duvet. There is invariably the dark mornings & nights to consider. All in all, it gives us more reasons to not get out there.

Regardless, winter running has it’s advantages when it comes to my beauty regime, which is minimal at best. These little freebies that I get whilst out on a winter run help my skin look & feel alive & healthy with no cost whatsoever. Beauty “treatments” courtesy of the trails & coastlines of North Cornwall are as follows:

Indian Head Massage achieved when running in a hail storm, granted not as relaxing but certainly stimulates the hair follicles!

Reflexology achieved by trail running over stony tracks through woodland & coast paths. This has in fact helped me to achieve pain free running after suffering with plantar fasciitis.

Beauty facials can be achieved by stepping out of the door, heading for the coast & letting mother nature do it’s thing. Invariably I return with rosy cheeks, clear eyes & feel a million dollars

Mud packs for my feet achieved the minute I get into the surrounding fields & trails. There is rarely a run when my trainers do not need a good scrub or at least a good airing!

Facial exfoliation / Microdermabrasion achieved by running along the beach on a windy day. Top tip is to keep eyes semi closed or have glasses at the ready otherwise your eyeballs may receive an unwanted exfoliation as well.

To top it all off, if you catch the weather in North Cornwall just right, you even enjoy a free shower at the end!

Lara x

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